Gambling Commission issue crane warning

Coinslot Gambling Commision Cranes
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The Gambling Commission has been cracking down on crane machines, issuing a warning to operators to make certain that their cranes are clearly marked as gambling machines, to ensure the machines don’t face removal by the GC.

The Gambling Commission has issued a stern reminder on the rules surrounding crane machines, having taken action against a number of operators in the past few months. In July last year, the GC widened the definition of what counts as a crane machine and although the Commission has not revealed whether the sites recently targeted had been caught out by the change in legislation or not.

Cranes, or crane grab non-complex category D gaming machines as they are officially known, means a machine which features a mechanical arm, or similar device to select a prize, and employ a compensator unit to determine the percentage pay-out. They have a maximum stake of £1 and a maximum £50 non-monetary prize.

The Commission has said that over the past nine months, nine machines have been removed from five different locations. These devices were “not correctly marked as gaming machines and were not situated within a gambling premises.” Arcades wishing to site crane games must have a premises license or permit from their local authority, or in some cases must acquire an operator’s licence from the Gambling Commission.

 

“They must also ensure the correct permit is in place which can be applied for via licensing authorities. If an operating licence is required then this can be applied for via our website.”

 

Sharon McNair, Commission director for industry insight and shared regulation, said: “It’s vital that all forms of gaming machines are regulated to ensure gambling is safe, fair and crime free.

“We are disappointed that a number of non-complex category D gaming machines have been offered to the public in breach of regulations. We expect anyone offering these products to ensure they have the correct permissions in place and the correct labelling indicating that they are gaming machines – and not skill machines – and feature responsible gambling messages.

“They must also ensure the correct permit is in place which can be applied for via licensing (local) authorities. If an operating licence is required then this can be applied for via our website.”

To ensure that these machines are correctly marked as gambling products, they must be fitted with labels, which can be acquired from BACTA.


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